2005 Hummer H2

2005 Hummer H2

Hummer H2 . Features: Extended Warranty, Yellow Exterior with Two-Toned Black Vinyl Graphics Adventure package, Chrome Locking gascap, Locking Middle Armrest, Leather Trimmed Upholstery, Driver 's Front Airbag, Passenger's Front Airbag, On*Star System, Power Windows, Power Door Locks, ABS Anti-Lock Brakes, Air Conditioning, Rear Air Conditioner, AM/FM Stereo Radio, CD Player, Bose Stereo System, Navigation System, Deep Tint Windows, Luggage Rack, Trailer Towing Package, Grill Guard, Running Boards, Front Tow Hooks, Alloy Wheels, , Dual Sport Mirrors, Power Mirror(S), Gauge Cluster, Interval Wipers, Tilt Steering Wheel, Steering Wheel Audio Controls, Front Bucket Seats, Reclining Seats, Power Seats, Lumbar Support Driver Seat, Universal Garage Door Opener Standard Equipment: Front And Rear Power Windows With Two One-Touch, Cruise Control, Torsion Beam Front Suspension Independent With Stabilizer Bar And Coil Springs, Trailing Arm Rear Suspension Rigid With Stabilizer Bar And Coil Springs, Trailer Towing Preparation, Four-Wheel ABS, Four Disc Brakes Including Four Ventilated Discs, Driver Front Airbag, Passenger Front Airbag With Occupant Switch Off, Peripheral Anti-Theft Protection, Unleaded Fuel, Electronic Brake Distribution, Electronic Traction Control Via ABS, Front Fog Lights, Windshield Wipers With Variable Intermittent Wipe, Power Steering, External Temperature, Emission Control Level Fed, Audio Anti-Theft Protection: Code, Two Height Adjustable Head Restraints On Front Seats And Rear Seats, Day Time Running Lights, Headlight Control With Time Delay Switch-Off And Dusk Sensor, Bucket Heated Electrically Adjustable Driver And Passenger Seat With Height Adjustment, Lumbar Adjustment, Five Adjustments And Tilt Adjustment, Zero Three Asymmetrical Split Bench Front Facing Heated Rear Seats With Adjustments, Coming Home Device, Garage Door Opener, Compass, Illuminated Entry System, Nine Speaker(S), Remote Audio Controls, Rear Separate Audio Control, Auxiliary Oil Cooler, Tachometer, Oil Pressure, Low Fuel Level Warning, Low Washer Fluid Level Warning, Brake Assist System, Ventilation System With Recirculation Setting And Micro Filter, Front Seat Center Armrest, Rear Seat Center Armrest, Delayed/Fade Courtesy Lights, Front And Rear Reading Lights, Leather Covered Multi-Function Steering Wheel With Tilt Adjustment, Clock, Full-size Alloy Rim Internal Spare Wheel, Online Information System, Rear Differential Lock, Automatic Drive Indicator On Dashboard, 3-Point Reel Front Seat Belts On Driver Seat And Passenger Seat Integrated, 3-Point Reel Rear Seat Belts On Driver Side, Passenger Side And Center Side, Immobilizer, Door Entry Light.
Price - $ 32,000



1951 Willys M-38 Army Jeep


Willys M-38 Army Jeep. L Head 4 cylinder 134.2 cu.in.engine. Changed to 12 Volt system, 4 wheel drive. One year old restoration, very nice condition, runs and drives well. Has all data plates and comes with a clear title.
Price - $ 12,500




1951 Willys Jeep Army Jeep
1951 Willys Jeep Army Jeep 1951 Willys Jeep Army Jeep 1951 Willys Jeep Army Jeep

1946 Willys CJ-2A


Willys CJ-2A . Complete frame off restoration 2005, "immaculate new condition". No expense spared to complete the restoration to original specs.. Painted original colors, Pasture Green and wheels Autumn Yellow.Frame was stripped, sandblasted and coated with Eastwood's corroless paint. 64,000 original miles on engine, starts easily, runs greats and never smokes. 3 speed manual transmission with high and low gear options. Engine detailed, new hoses, brakes, new wiring harness, original 6 volt system. E-mail or call for additional information and pictures of the Jeep.
PRICE REDUCED $ 11,500




1946 Willys Jeep
1946 Willys Jeep 1946 Willys Jeep 1946 Willys Jeep

2008 Honda DN-01: MD First Ride


Since we first saw the prototype a few years ago at the 2005 Tokyo
show, we had the feeling that the DN-01 was not just a futuristic
design exercise. It seemed like its intent was to find a home for the
new electrohydraulic HFT (Human Friendly Transmission), a transmission
that was gaining success in the world of ATVs, in a decidedly
unconventional motorcycle. Last year the production version debuted,
and it will be arriving in dealers (not in the U.S., for the moment)
with a 680-cc water-cooled v-twin engine derived from the Deauville
motorcycle. Aesthetically, the design of the final production version
is nearly 100-percent faithful to the first concepts.




Honda HFT Transmission

HFT Automatic; the secret

Well, we aren't going to go through a complete technical breakdown
here, the result of which would be a particularly complex discussion of
continuously variable transmission design. This Honda link
will tell you about the HFT technology if you are interested. Here we
intend to be more practical, and start by answering the question you're
all asking: does it work? The answer can only be a resounding yes.
Start the engine; press a button on the right marked "D". As soon as we
give the bike any throttle the "N" light goes out and the "D"
illuminates. We accelerate away as we would on a scooter. There's no
need to worry about a clutch lever or foot-operated gear selection
because those things don't exist on the DN-01.



What? We want to accelerate harder? Well, we'll have to press a
button at our right-hand fingertips. Once pushed an "S" illuminates
(for Sport) instead of an "N" or "D". It's quite clear that we're in
"S" mode when we open or close the throttle, because we can clearly
sense the electronic brain that controls the bike reacts more quickly
to our throttle inputs. In either case, there is clearly something
different going on here than anything we've ever experienced in a
megascooter: there is a distinct sense of connection between the
throttle and the rear wheel missing from most scooters.




When it's time to stop, you can press the right button to bring the
"N" onto the display. And as if by magic, we can now rev the
twin-cylinder engine without moving (or holding the brake). It's in
neutral as on any other bike.




It's also a manual!
Yes, the automatic mode works as advertised, and it works very well.
But since man cannot live on comfort and practicality alone,
particularly a man accustomed to two-wheeled vehicles, the bike offers
a playful side that appears once you press the button next to your
right index finger. Do so, and a number representing the gear we're in
appears on the right side of the screen. We're now in the manual mode,
where six preset ratios are at our command, except when we ask for a
gear that isn't rational. For example, at just 30 kilometers-per-hour
(18 mph) we can select fourth or fifth gear, but not sixth as the
bike's brain has determined that doing so will severely bog the engine.
Nor will the bike allow us to overrev the engine by selecting too low a
gear.

Manual mode allows you to safely downshift for acceleration or
deceleration. Something you probably do every day with your bike, but
the DN-01 does so without use of your hand and without a clutch. It's
all very video-game-like, but in reality the bike doesn't allow for
rider mistakes or strange behavior.



As also happens to automatic scooters that have preset gear ratios
(for example, the Suzuki Burgman 650), in practice one just ends up
leaving the bike in the automatic mode that most suits you, and that's
it. One last peculiarity: if we maintain a steady pace, the system will
eventually adopt he highest gear possible (lowering RPMs) to maintain
the selected speed. This is excellent for reducing fuel consumption and
emissions, in terms of both CO2 and sound.






Not just a gearbox

The DN-01, whose name is an acronym for "New Dream", brings much more
than an electrohydraulic gear shifter. The bike's design is futuristic,
but it has some features that reflect the "motorcycle of tomorrow" from
a decade ago. The aesthetic weight rests on the front end. Viewed from
the front, the design is aggressive and shark-like, with two
ellipsoidal and multiconvex headlamps leading the charge. The
windshield is low, clearly an aesthetic decision. The truth is that it
could be higher, but making it larger would ruin the style, and Honda
has been very careful with styling the DN-01.



Looking
at the bike from behind, the look is one of elegance and restraint, in
contrast with the front. This is a bit of a curiosity.


The chassis is a conventional double-cradle made of steel tubing,
but it is solid and does not flex as much as one might think given the
long overall length (the wheelbase is enormous). When we sit in the
wide saddle with our feet forward (on a cruiser-like footrest), and
with our hands held high and apart, we might think the bike is a
boulevard motorcycle and nothing else. Nothing could be further from
the truth.



All it takes is a slight hint of a turn (as if it was a car). The
incredibly low center of gravity does the rest, and the DN-01 takes the
corner without complaint. Only a few lightweight cruisers have these
moves, but they can't match the DN-01's stability at speed. We have to
consider that the suspension and brakes are those of an ordinary
motorcycle, and that the wheels are more like those of a sportbike than
a bike adorned in chrome.





Speaking of braking, the DN-01 incorporates a powerful and
unflappable system combined with the latest generation of ABS. We don't
like the bulky rear brake pedal, and the footrests rub as soon as we
lean the bike over, but they do fold easily. There isn't much to say
concerning the engine, and with the exception of the transmission
there's nothing here that we haven't previously seen. The engine has an
adequate amount of power to move the 270-kilogram (594 lbs.) bike with
two persons aboard to legal speeds with smoothness, low fuel
consumption and low maintenance.




What is it for and for whom?

These are questions that require some thought before we can reply.
Well, Honda asked us not to immediately compare their new product to a
scooter, a cruiser, or a sportbike, but to do so only after thoroughly
familiarizing ourselves with what it is, how it works, and above all,
its target audience. We were asked to try not to judge the new bike
based on the parameters used for scooters, cruisers, or sportbikes.



Let's break this down. A megascooter is not a direct competitor.
Megascooters have always placed a priority on a much larger load
capacity, and they've always had many more practical details (like
storage boxes or power outlets). Next to the DN-01, maintaining a
scooter requires more work; the DN-01 never requires one to change
belts or clutches.



If we compare the DN-01 to a cruiser, which with few exceptions are
equipped with a dazzling design and are highly customizable, the DN-01
looks the way it is going to look -- take it or leave it -- color
choice notwithstanding. But, in one sense, the DN-01's transmission
makes a mockery of any custom motorcycle, be it American, Japanese, or
European.



Sportsbikes are more agile and powerful, as are the majority of
motorcycles with medium or high displacements, but they are not as
unique as the DN-01, nor as easy to ride. Should you seasoned riders
think you're not going to like the relaxed nature of the HFT, suspend
judgment until you've ridden it for a few kilometers.

So what is it? It's a new product for a new audience. It may end up
being bought by the same people who first bought an iPod, or a
refrigerator with a crushed ice dispenser, or a plasma screen HD 1080
for the dining room of their home, of course linked to a Blu-Ray
player. This early-adopter might not have even thought about
motorcycles until they saw pictures of the DN-01 in design and
technology magazines, or on the internet.


It is to this audience that we state the DN-01 works very well, and
it doesn't require a degree to operate (you can get started without the
aid of your instruction manual). It doesn't have any space for a
MacBook Air (you'll have to bring your trendy laptop case), nor will it
recharge your iPhone. Perhaps a second generation (a hypothetical
DN-02, or DN-01 version 2.0), might have these features, but we have no
doubt that the HFT will eventually find its way into a wide range of
models . . . and deservedly so.




IN FAVOR:


Advanced Technology

Refinement

Unique ideas

Comfortable

Manageable handling



AGAINST


Mirror location

Driving Position

Only adequate power

Lacks space for cargo

2008 Honda DN-01: MD First Ride


Since we first saw the prototype a few years ago at the 2005 Tokyo
show, we had the feeling that the DN-01 was not just a futuristic
design exercise. It seemed like its intent was to find a home for the
new electrohydraulic HFT (Human Friendly Transmission), a transmission
that was gaining success in the world of ATVs, in a decidedly
unconventional motorcycle. Last year the production version debuted,
and it will be arriving in dealers (not in the U.S., for the moment)
with a 680-cc water-cooled v-twin engine derived from the Deauville
motorcycle. Aesthetically, the design of the final production version
is nearly 100-percent faithful to the first concepts.




Honda HFT Transmission

HFT Automatic; the secret

Well, we aren't going to go through a complete technical breakdown
here, the result of which would be a particularly complex discussion of
continuously variable transmission design. This Honda link
will tell you about the HFT technology if you are interested. Here we
intend to be more practical, and start by answering the question you're
all asking: does it work? The answer can only be a resounding yes.
Start the engine; press a button on the right marked "D". As soon as we
give the bike any throttle the "N" light goes out and the "D"
illuminates. We accelerate away as we would on a scooter. There's no
need to worry about a clutch lever or foot-operated gear selection
because those things don't exist on the DN-01.



What? We want to accelerate harder? Well, we'll have to press a
button at our right-hand fingertips. Once pushed an "S" illuminates
(for Sport) instead of an "N" or "D". It's quite clear that we're in
"S" mode when we open or close the throttle, because we can clearly
sense the electronic brain that controls the bike reacts more quickly
to our throttle inputs. In either case, there is clearly something
different going on here than anything we've ever experienced in a
megascooter: there is a distinct sense of connection between the
throttle and the rear wheel missing from most scooters.




When it's time to stop, you can press the right button to bring the
"N" onto the display. And as if by magic, we can now rev the
twin-cylinder engine without moving (or holding the brake). It's in
neutral as on any other bike.




It's also a manual!
Yes, the automatic mode works as advertised, and it works very well.
But since man cannot live on comfort and practicality alone,
particularly a man accustomed to two-wheeled vehicles, the bike offers
a playful side that appears once you press the button next to your
right index finger. Do so, and a number representing the gear we're in
appears on the right side of the screen. We're now in the manual mode,
where six preset ratios are at our command, except when we ask for a
gear that isn't rational. For example, at just 30 kilometers-per-hour
(18 mph) we can select fourth or fifth gear, but not sixth as the
bike's brain has determined that doing so will severely bog the engine.
Nor will the bike allow us to overrev the engine by selecting too low a
gear.

Manual mode allows you to safely downshift for acceleration or
deceleration. Something you probably do every day with your bike, but
the DN-01 does so without use of your hand and without a clutch. It's
all very video-game-like, but in reality the bike doesn't allow for
rider mistakes or strange behavior.



As also happens to automatic scooters that have preset gear ratios
(for example, the Suzuki Burgman 650), in practice one just ends up
leaving the bike in the automatic mode that most suits you, and that's
it. One last peculiarity: if we maintain a steady pace, the system will
eventually adopt he highest gear possible (lowering RPMs) to maintain
the selected speed. This is excellent for reducing fuel consumption and
emissions, in terms of both CO2 and sound.






Not just a gearbox

The DN-01, whose name is an acronym for "New Dream", brings much more
than an electrohydraulic gear shifter. The bike's design is futuristic,
but it has some features that reflect the "motorcycle of tomorrow" from
a decade ago. The aesthetic weight rests on the front end. Viewed from
the front, the design is aggressive and shark-like, with two
ellipsoidal and multiconvex headlamps leading the charge. The
windshield is low, clearly an aesthetic decision. The truth is that it
could be higher, but making it larger would ruin the style, and Honda
has been very careful with styling the DN-01.



Looking
at the bike from behind, the look is one of elegance and restraint, in
contrast with the front. This is a bit of a curiosity.


The chassis is a conventional double-cradle made of steel tubing,
but it is solid and does not flex as much as one might think given the
long overall length (the wheelbase is enormous). When we sit in the
wide saddle with our feet forward (on a cruiser-like footrest), and
with our hands held high and apart, we might think the bike is a
boulevard motorcycle and nothing else. Nothing could be further from
the truth.



All it takes is a slight hint of a turn (as if it was a car). The
incredibly low center of gravity does the rest, and the DN-01 takes the
corner without complaint. Only a few lightweight cruisers have these
moves, but they can't match the DN-01's stability at speed. We have to
consider that the suspension and brakes are those of an ordinary
motorcycle, and that the wheels are more like those of a sportbike than
a bike adorned in chrome.





Speaking of braking, the DN-01 incorporates a powerful and
unflappable system combined with the latest generation of ABS. We don't
like the bulky rear brake pedal, and the footrests rub as soon as we
lean the bike over, but they do fold easily. There isn't much to say
concerning the engine, and with the exception of the transmission
there's nothing here that we haven't previously seen. The engine has an
adequate amount of power to move the 270-kilogram (594 lbs.) bike with
two persons aboard to legal speeds with smoothness, low fuel
consumption and low maintenance.




What is it for and for whom?

These are questions that require some thought before we can reply.
Well, Honda asked us not to immediately compare their new product to a
scooter, a cruiser, or a sportbike, but to do so only after thoroughly
familiarizing ourselves with what it is, how it works, and above all,
its target audience. We were asked to try not to judge the new bike
based on the parameters used for scooters, cruisers, or sportbikes.



Let's break this down. A megascooter is not a direct competitor.
Megascooters have always placed a priority on a much larger load
capacity, and they've always had many more practical details (like
storage boxes or power outlets). Next to the DN-01, maintaining a
scooter requires more work; the DN-01 never requires one to change
belts or clutches.



If we compare the DN-01 to a cruiser, which with few exceptions are
equipped with a dazzling design and are highly customizable, the DN-01
looks the way it is going to look -- take it or leave it -- color
choice notwithstanding. But, in one sense, the DN-01's transmission
makes a mockery of any custom motorcycle, be it American, Japanese, or
European.



Sportsbikes are more agile and powerful, as are the majority of
motorcycles with medium or high displacements, but they are not as
unique as the DN-01, nor as easy to ride. Should you seasoned riders
think you're not going to like the relaxed nature of the HFT, suspend
judgment until you've ridden it for a few kilometers.

So what is it? It's a new product for a new audience. It may end up
being bought by the same people who first bought an iPod, or a
refrigerator with a crushed ice dispenser, or a plasma screen HD 1080
for the dining room of their home, of course linked to a Blu-Ray
player. This early-adopter might not have even thought about
motorcycles until they saw pictures of the DN-01 in design and
technology magazines, or on the internet.


It is to this audience that we state the DN-01 works very well, and
it doesn't require a degree to operate (you can get started without the
aid of your instruction manual). It doesn't have any space for a
MacBook Air (you'll have to bring your trendy laptop case), nor will it
recharge your iPhone. Perhaps a second generation (a hypothetical
DN-02, or DN-01 version 2.0), might have these features, but we have no
doubt that the HFT will eventually find its way into a wide range of
models . . . and deservedly so.




IN FAVOR:


Advanced Technology

Refinement

Unique ideas

Comfortable

Manageable handling



AGAINST


Mirror location

Driving Position

Only adequate power

Lacks space for cargo

The Perfect Porridge: 2009 Husqvarna TE 310


Last week in Barcelona, Husqvarna introduced a new displacement to
its line of enduro machines. The 2009 TE 310 features a bored out 250
(from 76mm to 83mm) engine that Husky hopes many consumers have been
waiting for. In fact, several after-market kits will take your 250cc
four-stroke motocross or off-road machine to roughly 310cc, because
many riders (particularly, amateurs) feel this is the ideal combination
of the light, tossable 250 with the added torque of a bigger bike.

The new 310 will have a lighter chassis, and other changes that will be
shared with various 2009 model Husqvarnas. We will provide more details
when they are available.

The Perfect Porridge: 2009 Husqvarna TE 310


Last week in Barcelona, Husqvarna introduced a new displacement to
its line of enduro machines. The 2009 TE 310 features a bored out 250
(from 76mm to 83mm) engine that Husky hopes many consumers have been
waiting for. In fact, several after-market kits will take your 250cc
four-stroke motocross or off-road machine to roughly 310cc, because
many riders (particularly, amateurs) feel this is the ideal combination
of the light, tossable 250 with the added torque of a bigger bike.

The new 310 will have a lighter chassis, and other changes that will be
shared with various 2009 model Husqvarnas. We will provide more details
when they are available.

2009 Kawasaki KLX250S: MD First Ride


Despite an overall downturn in motorcycle sales, interest in dual
sport bikes is continuing to rise. The reasons? That is difficult to
say with any precision, but these bikes serve a number of market
targets. The lower displacement 250cc bikes appeal to beginning riders,
returning riders, experienced riders seeking a second bike and
commuters. The price point of the bike we test here, $4,899.00, is
another reason for interest in this category.


Changes to the KLX250S for 2009 are not necessarily large in number,
but they are significant. The KLX250S has better power this year as a
result of a revised exhaust system and new carburetor settings. Gear
ratios were tightened by moving sixth gear closer to fifth. Cooling is
improved with a new radiator design as well.



A slightly steeper steering head rake is said to improve both
stability and turning. A new, stiffer swingarm with much nicer chain
adjusters rounds out the chassis changes.


The suspension is revised with new damping settings and a new rear
linkage (to compliment the new swingarm). Those suspension pieces hold
wheels with beefer spokes and new petal-styled disc brakes (including a
larger 240mm disc up front). Ergonomics get tweaked with
higher/straighter handlebars and a revised seat shape featuring firmer
foam.


A trick new digital instrument panel is very legible, and features a
sweeping tachometer, speedometer, clock, odometer, and dual trip meters.


Kawasaki invited us to Death Valley here in Southern California for
a surprisingly intense press introduction that sent at least one
experienced journalist back to paved roads when he decided the off-road
course was a little bit too tough.



Death Valley should be famous for a lot of things, but it is really
only famous worldwide for one thing. Heat. We stayed at the
appropriately named Furnace Creek Inn near the heart of the valley but
traversed many of its paved roads and unpaved trails (primarily, the
latter) throughout a day of riding that seriously challenged the skill
of the journalists as much as it did the competency of our mount.


After a short stint on paved roads, we immediately dove onto trails
full of rocks of various sizes and shapes (including some of the large,
jagged-edge variety). If you weren't comfortable having your bike slide
around beneath you (including the front contact patch, from
time-to-time), this was a pretty hairy trip. After hours of this stuff,
I wondered how yours truly (weighing in at 210 pounds on a good day)
had not experienced a pinch flat. I found out that Kawasaki had
inflated the dual sport tires to in excess of 20 PSI, both front and
rear. Not a bad thing on the street, I suppose, but a prescription for
dicey traction on the silty, hard-packed trails we would ride later in
the day.



Given my personal background on dirt bikes, I suppose I felt more
comfortable than most during this ride. Frankly, I thought it was a
blast . . . one of the best press intros I had ever attended.
Nevertheless, I had a couple of close calls when I "lost the front"
trying to change directions on the loose shale beneath me.


Overall, the new KLX250S acquitted itself extremely well. It wasn't
too long ago that a fast rider of my girth would bottom the suspension
of a typical dual sport repeatedly, and frequently, on a ride such as
this one. I don't know that I bottomed the fork or the shock on the
KLX250S all day long. Despite this, the suspension felt plush and
controlled . . . soaking up the frequent square-edged bumps (despite
the high tire pressures) without much complaint.


I would normally want more spring preload in the rear shock, given
the fact that I outweigh the target customer significantly. I opted to
leave the rear shock alone when I started the press ride, and I did not
feel that I had any steering issues despite this. The KLX250S displayed
good stability and solid turning capability throughout the day. Despite
the overly high tire pressures (and the occasional front end slide),
the bike felt like it was balanced well, with the right distribution of
weight between front end and rear end. Part of this may be credited to
the change in front end geometry. Whatever the reason, it was hard to
fault the handling of the KLX250S while riding terrain that would leave
the typical dual sport (and its rider) begging for mercy.


The transmission shifted reliably, and presented no issues. At
times, I felt like I could use a stronger brake up front on paved
sections (which is fairly typical for a dual sport, with its relatively
small front disc), but braking was solid and predictable off-road (when
I could get the front tire to bite).



Not surprisingly, the 278 pound KLX250S felt light and nimble. The
seat height also seemed shorter than most dual sports (and at 35
inches, it is) allowing me to get my feet flat on the ground at rest,
and to "dab" when needed on tight, slippery trails.


Despite five hours, or so, in the saddle I couldn't complain about
the seat, either. The width and density of the foam seemed a good
compromise between off-road and street comfort, but as stated, we spent
little time on the road. If you use this bike primarily as a commuter,
you might want a different, after-market seat that is a bit wider and
firmer.



Engine power was very good. The powerband was broad, and despite the
relatively short gearing, the KLX250S was comfortably able to maintain
70 mph on the highway. Overall, I would say power is down a bit on the
new Yamaha WR250R
we tested a little while ago, and the Yamaha could carry higher speed
on the street, but there is a fairly significant price difference (the
Yamaha being $1,000 more expensive).





Still carbureted, but relatively affordable, the Kawasaki KLX250S
receives a good dose of performance and refinement for the 2009 model
year. The bike is fun, and extremely capable off-road. It also features
one of the nicest digital instrument panels available on a dual sport
bike. Available in either Sunbeam Red or Lime Green, the 2009 Kawasaki
KLX250S retails for $4,899. For additional details and specifications,
visit Kawasaki's web site

2009 Kawasaki KLX250S: MD First Ride


Despite an overall downturn in motorcycle sales, interest in dual
sport bikes is continuing to rise. The reasons? That is difficult to
say with any precision, but these bikes serve a number of market
targets. The lower displacement 250cc bikes appeal to beginning riders,
returning riders, experienced riders seeking a second bike and
commuters. The price point of the bike we test here, $4,899.00, is
another reason for interest in this category.


Changes to the KLX250S for 2009 are not necessarily large in number,
but they are significant. The KLX250S has better power this year as a
result of a revised exhaust system and new carburetor settings. Gear
ratios were tightened by moving sixth gear closer to fifth. Cooling is
improved with a new radiator design as well.



A slightly steeper steering head rake is said to improve both
stability and turning. A new, stiffer swingarm with much nicer chain
adjusters rounds out the chassis changes.


The suspension is revised with new damping settings and a new rear
linkage (to compliment the new swingarm). Those suspension pieces hold
wheels with beefer spokes and new petal-styled disc brakes (including a
larger 240mm disc up front). Ergonomics get tweaked with
higher/straighter handlebars and a revised seat shape featuring firmer
foam.


A trick new digital instrument panel is very legible, and features a
sweeping tachometer, speedometer, clock, odometer, and dual trip meters.


Kawasaki invited us to Death Valley here in Southern California for
a surprisingly intense press introduction that sent at least one
experienced journalist back to paved roads when he decided the off-road
course was a little bit too tough.



Death Valley should be famous for a lot of things, but it is really
only famous worldwide for one thing. Heat. We stayed at the
appropriately named Furnace Creek Inn near the heart of the valley but
traversed many of its paved roads and unpaved trails (primarily, the
latter) throughout a day of riding that seriously challenged the skill
of the journalists as much as it did the competency of our mount.


After a short stint on paved roads, we immediately dove onto trails
full of rocks of various sizes and shapes (including some of the large,
jagged-edge variety). If you weren't comfortable having your bike slide
around beneath you (including the front contact patch, from
time-to-time), this was a pretty hairy trip. After hours of this stuff,
I wondered how yours truly (weighing in at 210 pounds on a good day)
had not experienced a pinch flat. I found out that Kawasaki had
inflated the dual sport tires to in excess of 20 PSI, both front and
rear. Not a bad thing on the street, I suppose, but a prescription for
dicey traction on the silty, hard-packed trails we would ride later in
the day.



Given my personal background on dirt bikes, I suppose I felt more
comfortable than most during this ride. Frankly, I thought it was a
blast . . . one of the best press intros I had ever attended.
Nevertheless, I had a couple of close calls when I "lost the front"
trying to change directions on the loose shale beneath me.


Overall, the new KLX250S acquitted itself extremely well. It wasn't
too long ago that a fast rider of my girth would bottom the suspension
of a typical dual sport repeatedly, and frequently, on a ride such as
this one. I don't know that I bottomed the fork or the shock on the
KLX250S all day long. Despite this, the suspension felt plush and
controlled . . . soaking up the frequent square-edged bumps (despite
the high tire pressures) without much complaint.


I would normally want more spring preload in the rear shock, given
the fact that I outweigh the target customer significantly. I opted to
leave the rear shock alone when I started the press ride, and I did not
feel that I had any steering issues despite this. The KLX250S displayed
good stability and solid turning capability throughout the day. Despite
the overly high tire pressures (and the occasional front end slide),
the bike felt like it was balanced well, with the right distribution of
weight between front end and rear end. Part of this may be credited to
the change in front end geometry. Whatever the reason, it was hard to
fault the handling of the KLX250S while riding terrain that would leave
the typical dual sport (and its rider) begging for mercy.


The transmission shifted reliably, and presented no issues. At
times, I felt like I could use a stronger brake up front on paved
sections (which is fairly typical for a dual sport, with its relatively
small front disc), but braking was solid and predictable off-road (when
I could get the front tire to bite).



Not surprisingly, the 278 pound KLX250S felt light and nimble. The
seat height also seemed shorter than most dual sports (and at 35
inches, it is) allowing me to get my feet flat on the ground at rest,
and to "dab" when needed on tight, slippery trails.


Despite five hours, or so, in the saddle I couldn't complain about
the seat, either. The width and density of the foam seemed a good
compromise between off-road and street comfort, but as stated, we spent
little time on the road. If you use this bike primarily as a commuter,
you might want a different, after-market seat that is a bit wider and
firmer.



Engine power was very good. The powerband was broad, and despite the
relatively short gearing, the KLX250S was comfortably able to maintain
70 mph on the highway. Overall, I would say power is down a bit on the
new Yamaha WR250R
we tested a little while ago, and the Yamaha could carry higher speed
on the street, but there is a fairly significant price difference (the
Yamaha being $1,000 more expensive).





Still carbureted, but relatively affordable, the Kawasaki KLX250S
receives a good dose of performance and refinement for the 2009 model
year. The bike is fun, and extremely capable off-road. It also features
one of the nicest digital instrument panels available on a dual sport
bike. Available in either Sunbeam Red or Lime Green, the 2009 Kawasaki
KLX250S retails for $4,899. For additional details and specifications,
visit Kawasaki's web site

KTM RC8 Superbike To Go Into Production

KTM RC8 Superbike To Go Into Production

KTM is to launch the production version of its RC8 sports bike next week a whole four years after the first concept machine - a litre-class V-twin was shown.


The company has released the pic of the new dashboard which looks like no other from this angle.
The other pic is an early prototype.

Of most interest is whether the company is taking advantage of new superbike class rules which allow a 1200 twin.

It seems logical the company would, leaving the door open to go racing.

Superbikes may be coming in for a bit of a resurgence, with BMW and MV Agusta also expressing interest in the class.

KTM RC8 Superbike To Go Into Production

KTM RC8 Superbike To Go Into Production

KTM is to launch the production version of its RC8 sports bike next week a whole four years after the first concept machine - a litre-class V-twin was shown.


The company has released the pic of the new dashboard which looks like no other from this angle.
The other pic is an early prototype.

Of most interest is whether the company is taking advantage of new superbike class rules which allow a 1200 twin.

It seems logical the company would, leaving the door open to go racing.

Superbikes may be coming in for a bit of a resurgence, with BMW and MV Agusta also expressing interest in the class.

Ducati Unveils 848 Superbike

Ducati Unveils 848 Superbike

The new 848 enjoys all the performance advancements of the entire Superbike family, while adding its own innovations to redefine the middleweight sport bike class.

The words ‘agile’ and ‘refined’ aptly describe the 848. At 168kg (369lbs) the 848 is an amazing 20kg (44lbs) lighter than its predecessor, and a significant 5kg (11lbs) lighter than its larger capacity brother, the 1098.

The highly advanced 848 engine uses an improved method of engine case production in which cases are vacuum die-cast formed. While providing significant weight savings of more than 3kg (6.5lbs), this method also ensures consistent wall thickness and increased strength. Further refinements include a sophisticated wet clutch that offers 1kg (2.2lbs) less weight, a much higher service life, improved clutch feel and quiet operation.
With the first twist of the wrist, the powerful rush of the Testastretta Evoluzione engine confirms that the rules have changed. The 848’s 134hp is not only 30% more powerful than its predecessor, but it provides a power-to-weight ratio even better than the potent 999.

The new engine

The new 848 Testastretta Evoluzione engine becomes the benchmark for the middleweight sportsbike category, benefitting from all the experience accumulated with the larger engine on the 1098. It successfully adopts the same design guidelines and the same compact cylinder and cylinder head layout, but introduces for the first time ever an innovative solution for the crankcase, which has been designed with a further weight reduction for this advanced engine in mind. The overall layout of this engine integrates a series of avant-guard solutions, confirming the close links with the experience of Ducati’s racing department.

The 849cc engine has bore and stroke values of 94mm and 61.2mm respectively, which produce a ratio that is only slightly inferior to the 1098 (1.54 compared with 1.61), while maintaining the highly ‘over-square’ layout typical of racing engines.

Power output is an impressive 134hp (98.5kW) at 10,000 rpm and maximum torque is 9.8kgm (96Nm) at 8250 rpm. The power and torque values confirm the high performance level of this engine, especially when compared to its predecessor, the Testastretta-engined 749.

The cylinder head has been modified in line with the characteristic bore and stroke of the engine in order to optimize the fluid dynamics of the intake (straight and plunging) and exhaust ducts and combustion chamber. The compression ratio is 12:1.

The valve angle is the same as the 1098 engine and diameter is 39.5mm for the inlet valve and 32mm for the exhaust. The technology used sees the application of a bi-metallic alloy that combines increased lightness with resistance and reliability required for these particular components. The desmodromic control system has also been designed with the weight and the inertia of the new components in mind, allowing extremely efficient valve lift during intake and exhaust phases. The excellent results achieved are confirmed by the engine’s power figures, producing outstanding performance thanks also to the use of MotoGP-derived elliptical throttle bodies, which have been fitted to the 1098 engine.

The design of a dedicated elliptical throttle body for the 848 demonstrates the attention that Borgo Panigale engineers have devoted to the development of the Superbike range. The cross-section is reduced from the 60 sq. mm of the 1098 to 56 sq. mm so as to optimize fluid dynamics at every engine speed.
Just like on the 1098, the new cylinder heads benefit from fewer components and include magnesium covers.

For the first time ever, this Testastretta Evoluzione engine sees the introduction of a special technology for the construction of the engine crankcase: Vacural casting. This is a forced vacuum die casting method that allows jet characteristics to be improved thanks to the absence of porosity, gas inclusion and oxidation. This allows extremely high measurement precision and greater ductility for aluminium alloy. Designers have been able to harness the benefits of this innovative process by redefining the shape and the wall thickness of the new crankcase by means of FEA (Finite Element Analysis) checks, which allowed the required reliability standards to be achieved, while simultaneously obtaining a significant weight saving of 3.5kg.

The 848 engine is fitted with a silent modular wet clutch, characterized by an exceptional resistance to wear that will lead to superior duration. This solution makes a useful contribution to weight saving, estimated to be around 1.6kg, which is also due to the use of a different type of clutch cover.

The high power figures achieved by this engine also come from the use of the same type of oil cooler and coolant radiator as the 1098’s engine, with an increased surface area assisted by lightweight, high flow electric fan assemblies.

Finally, the 848’s exhaust system follows the same layout and uses the same innovative technology as the 1098. The system terminates with Ducati’s trademark twin under-seat silencers, delivering the unmistakable signature sound of the big bore 90° L-Twin.
This power unit, just like all the other Ducati engines, has been designed to comply with Euro 3 exhaust emission norms.

Chassis

Trellis frame

Developed in cooperation with Ducati Corse, the 848 Trellis frame has a simplified tube layout featuring main section tubes increased in diameter from 28mm to 34mm, while being reduced in thickness from 2mm to 1.5mm. The result is a 14% increase in rigidity and a weight saving of 1.5kg (3.3lbs).

Single-sided swingarm

The 848, as all the Superbike family, is equipped with a unique single-sided swingarm. The engineers were encouraged to re-think the construction technique of this element. The solution was to produce the main operational components using individual aluminium castings so as to ensure strength around the pivot points, wheel hub and suspension links, with fabricated aluminium sections used to complete the construction into a single, beautifully engineered component.

Rear suspension

Highlighting the way in which individual components are influenced by each other, the new lightweight Trellis frame and single-sided swingarm have enabled a more compact and further weight-saving rear suspension linkage system to be used featuring separate lower pick-up points for the push-rod and suspension unit. This ‘tandem’ design effectively reduces stress around the linkage pick-up area of the Trellis frame. Working together with this highly efficient linkage is a fully adjustable Showa single shock for the 848, the same as the 1098.

Front suspension

At the front the new 848 is equipped with fully adjustable 43mm Showa forks with radial mounts. This type of front suspension is professionally track-tuned and offers superior road holding, delivers superior feedback, and helps every rider to be more confident and in control.

Control

Brembo Monobloc calipers

The 848 brake system is characterized by M4 calipers using four 32mm pistons and two radial mounted pads. Matched to the calipers are two 320mm discs and the combination of these elements achieves spectacular braking power.

Super lightweight wheels

The new 848 also benefits from lightweight Marchesini Y-shaped spoke wheels. The weight saving of 250gr achieved on the front wheel substantially reduces the moment of inertia and enhances the 848’s change of direction and braking performance. The rear wheel is just as impressive with a complete redesign for its single-sided swingarm application that has resulted in a reduction of over 1kg compared with traditional Ducati single-sided swingarm fitments. Finally a 5.50” wheel fitted with a 180/55 tyre guarantees the maximum agility at the rear.

Ducati Unveils 848 Superbike

Ducati Unveils 848 Superbike

The new 848 enjoys all the performance advancements of the entire Superbike family, while adding its own innovations to redefine the middleweight sport bike class.

The words ‘agile’ and ‘refined’ aptly describe the 848. At 168kg (369lbs) the 848 is an amazing 20kg (44lbs) lighter than its predecessor, and a significant 5kg (11lbs) lighter than its larger capacity brother, the 1098.

The highly advanced 848 engine uses an improved method of engine case production in which cases are vacuum die-cast formed. While providing significant weight savings of more than 3kg (6.5lbs), this method also ensures consistent wall thickness and increased strength. Further refinements include a sophisticated wet clutch that offers 1kg (2.2lbs) less weight, a much higher service life, improved clutch feel and quiet operation.
With the first twist of the wrist, the powerful rush of the Testastretta Evoluzione engine confirms that the rules have changed. The 848’s 134hp is not only 30% more powerful than its predecessor, but it provides a power-to-weight ratio even better than the potent 999.

The new engine

The new 848 Testastretta Evoluzione engine becomes the benchmark for the middleweight sportsbike category, benefitting from all the experience accumulated with the larger engine on the 1098. It successfully adopts the same design guidelines and the same compact cylinder and cylinder head layout, but introduces for the first time ever an innovative solution for the crankcase, which has been designed with a further weight reduction for this advanced engine in mind. The overall layout of this engine integrates a series of avant-guard solutions, confirming the close links with the experience of Ducati’s racing department.

The 849cc engine has bore and stroke values of 94mm and 61.2mm respectively, which produce a ratio that is only slightly inferior to the 1098 (1.54 compared with 1.61), while maintaining the highly ‘over-square’ layout typical of racing engines.

Power output is an impressive 134hp (98.5kW) at 10,000 rpm and maximum torque is 9.8kgm (96Nm) at 8250 rpm. The power and torque values confirm the high performance level of this engine, especially when compared to its predecessor, the Testastretta-engined 749.

The cylinder head has been modified in line with the characteristic bore and stroke of the engine in order to optimize the fluid dynamics of the intake (straight and plunging) and exhaust ducts and combustion chamber. The compression ratio is 12:1.

The valve angle is the same as the 1098 engine and diameter is 39.5mm for the inlet valve and 32mm for the exhaust. The technology used sees the application of a bi-metallic alloy that combines increased lightness with resistance and reliability required for these particular components. The desmodromic control system has also been designed with the weight and the inertia of the new components in mind, allowing extremely efficient valve lift during intake and exhaust phases. The excellent results achieved are confirmed by the engine’s power figures, producing outstanding performance thanks also to the use of MotoGP-derived elliptical throttle bodies, which have been fitted to the 1098 engine.

The design of a dedicated elliptical throttle body for the 848 demonstrates the attention that Borgo Panigale engineers have devoted to the development of the Superbike range. The cross-section is reduced from the 60 sq. mm of the 1098 to 56 sq. mm so as to optimize fluid dynamics at every engine speed.
Just like on the 1098, the new cylinder heads benefit from fewer components and include magnesium covers.

For the first time ever, this Testastretta Evoluzione engine sees the introduction of a special technology for the construction of the engine crankcase: Vacural casting. This is a forced vacuum die casting method that allows jet characteristics to be improved thanks to the absence of porosity, gas inclusion and oxidation. This allows extremely high measurement precision and greater ductility for aluminium alloy. Designers have been able to harness the benefits of this innovative process by redefining the shape and the wall thickness of the new crankcase by means of FEA (Finite Element Analysis) checks, which allowed the required reliability standards to be achieved, while simultaneously obtaining a significant weight saving of 3.5kg.

The 848 engine is fitted with a silent modular wet clutch, characterized by an exceptional resistance to wear that will lead to superior duration. This solution makes a useful contribution to weight saving, estimated to be around 1.6kg, which is also due to the use of a different type of clutch cover.

The high power figures achieved by this engine also come from the use of the same type of oil cooler and coolant radiator as the 1098’s engine, with an increased surface area assisted by lightweight, high flow electric fan assemblies.

Finally, the 848’s exhaust system follows the same layout and uses the same innovative technology as the 1098. The system terminates with Ducati’s trademark twin under-seat silencers, delivering the unmistakable signature sound of the big bore 90° L-Twin.
This power unit, just like all the other Ducati engines, has been designed to comply with Euro 3 exhaust emission norms.

Chassis

Trellis frame

Developed in cooperation with Ducati Corse, the 848 Trellis frame has a simplified tube layout featuring main section tubes increased in diameter from 28mm to 34mm, while being reduced in thickness from 2mm to 1.5mm. The result is a 14% increase in rigidity and a weight saving of 1.5kg (3.3lbs).

Single-sided swingarm

The 848, as all the Superbike family, is equipped with a unique single-sided swingarm. The engineers were encouraged to re-think the construction technique of this element. The solution was to produce the main operational components using individual aluminium castings so as to ensure strength around the pivot points, wheel hub and suspension links, with fabricated aluminium sections used to complete the construction into a single, beautifully engineered component.

Rear suspension

Highlighting the way in which individual components are influenced by each other, the new lightweight Trellis frame and single-sided swingarm have enabled a more compact and further weight-saving rear suspension linkage system to be used featuring separate lower pick-up points for the push-rod and suspension unit. This ‘tandem’ design effectively reduces stress around the linkage pick-up area of the Trellis frame. Working together with this highly efficient linkage is a fully adjustable Showa single shock for the 848, the same as the 1098.

Front suspension

At the front the new 848 is equipped with fully adjustable 43mm Showa forks with radial mounts. This type of front suspension is professionally track-tuned and offers superior road holding, delivers superior feedback, and helps every rider to be more confident and in control.

Control

Brembo Monobloc calipers

The 848 brake system is characterized by M4 calipers using four 32mm pistons and two radial mounted pads. Matched to the calipers are two 320mm discs and the combination of these elements achieves spectacular braking power.

Super lightweight wheels

The new 848 also benefits from lightweight Marchesini Y-shaped spoke wheels. The weight saving of 250gr achieved on the front wheel substantially reduces the moment of inertia and enhances the 848’s change of direction and braking performance. The rear wheel is just as impressive with a complete redesign for its single-sided swingarm application that has resulted in a reduction of over 1kg compared with traditional Ducati single-sided swingarm fitments. Finally a 5.50” wheel fitted with a 180/55 tyre guarantees the maximum agility at the rear.

Cagiva Mito 125 2008

Cagiva Mito 125 2008

Spy images have emerged ahead of EICMA Motorcycle Show in Milan of two versions of the Cagiva Mito 125 two-stroke that MV Agusta plans to unveil.

These images show the two-stroke versions, the red being the standard model, dubbed the Cagiva Mito SP125, and the black/silver bike being the up-spec, race-orientated version, called the Mito SP525.

Despite its name, the SP525 isa a 125cc two-stroke, not the large-capacity, single cylinder, four-stroke version that's expected to bear an MV Agusta badge. The four-stroke should be unveiled at the Milan show.

Cagiva Mito 125 2008

Cagiva Mito 125 2008

Spy images have emerged ahead of EICMA Motorcycle Show in Milan of two versions of the Cagiva Mito 125 two-stroke that MV Agusta plans to unveil.

These images show the two-stroke versions, the red being the standard model, dubbed the Cagiva Mito SP125, and the black/silver bike being the up-spec, race-orientated version, called the Mito SP525.

Despite its name, the SP525 isa a 125cc two-stroke, not the large-capacity, single cylinder, four-stroke version that's expected to bear an MV Agusta badge. The four-stroke should be unveiled at the Milan show.

BMW Motorrad's Exciting New Motorcycles For 2008

BMW Motorrad's Exciting New Motorcycles For 2008


Having recently added the new HP2 Sport to its expanding model line-up, BMW Motorrad further demonstrated its commitment to developing its ‘new design philosophy’ at the EIMCA Show in Milan, unveiling a further three brand new motorcycles and two up-rated models for 2008:

F 650 GS – an all-new version of the popular GS all-rounder
F 800 GS – a completely new middleweight adventure tourer with excellent off-road performance
G 450 X Sports Enduro – a brand new model for the competition enduro and sports off-road market
R 1200 GS – an updated version of BMW Motorrad’s best selling GS model
R 1200 GS Adventure – an improved model of the ultimate long-distance enduro
BMW’s industry-leading dedication to off-road sport and adventure riding – a genre it created and popularised more than two-and-a-half decades ago – has been further strengthened following the launch of these five new models.

With two completely new enduro models, the F 800 GS and F 650 GS, BMW Motorrad is not just expanding its range of products but also presenting a worthy successor to the successful single-cylinder F 650 GS.

F 650 GS
The F 650 GS, despite its familiar designation, is a completely new machine. Along with its bigger brother, the F 800 GS, it is powered by BMW’s sophisticated and highly praised 798cc parallel-twin engine, albeit in a softer state of tune, which provides plenty of power combined with excellent fuel economy. The bike’s low seat height and light controls make the F 650 GS an easy to handle all-rounder, perfectly suited to newcomers to motorcycling and ideal for everyday use.

F 800 GS
The all-new F 800 GS expands BMW Motorrad’s class leading traditions into the middleweight adventure sports category. The overall package combines balance, power and weight with excellent ground clearance and long suspension travel. The result is a machine with excellent off-road riding performance combined with touring capability.

G 450 X
Entering the competitive 450cc enduro market will be the brand new, no compromise, BMW G 450 X Sports Enduro. This machine will feature an innovative 450cc single cylinder engine and unique chassis design. Having been successfully tested in European and world competition throughout 2007, its entry into the 450cc Enduro market in the middle of next year will see BMW Motorrad continue its philosophy of launching class-leading machinery in competitive new market segments.

R 1200 GS and Adventure
There are also further improvements and developments to the all-terrain big boxer machines – the unchallenged choice of the world’s most adventurous overlanders, including Ewan MacGregor and Charley Boorman. The new version of the best selling R 1200 GS, and its Adventure variant, benefit from a more powerful engine with improved drive and traction. New for 2008, both models will be offered with the option of a new Enduro version of ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment).

The unique system offers R 1200 GS and Adventure owners the opportunity to tune their suspension for on or off-road use at the touch of a button.

Tony Jakeman, BMW Motorrad Marketing Manager, said: “With the launch of five exciting new models BMW Motorrad continues to broaden its appeal to a wider motorcycle audience. Eagerly anticipated models such as the F 650 GS and F 800 GS will not only attract new riders to BMW, but will also please existing Motorrad fans with their performance, handling and good looks.

“The up-rated versions of the best-selling R 1200 GS and Adventure, with our unique Electronic Suspension Adjustment system, will reinforce our leadership in the Adventure motorcycle sector. We are also excited to be entering even more diverse market segments with models such as the G 450 X, reinforcing our philosophy to launch class leading machinery into new motorcycle market sectors.”

BMW Motorrad's Exciting New Motorcycles For 2008

BMW Motorrad's Exciting New Motorcycles For 2008


Having recently added the new HP2 Sport to its expanding model line-up, BMW Motorrad further demonstrated its commitment to developing its ‘new design philosophy’ at the EIMCA Show in Milan, unveiling a further three brand new motorcycles and two up-rated models for 2008:

F 650 GS – an all-new version of the popular GS all-rounder
F 800 GS – a completely new middleweight adventure tourer with excellent off-road performance
G 450 X Sports Enduro – a brand new model for the competition enduro and sports off-road market
R 1200 GS – an updated version of BMW Motorrad’s best selling GS model
R 1200 GS Adventure – an improved model of the ultimate long-distance enduro
BMW’s industry-leading dedication to off-road sport and adventure riding – a genre it created and popularised more than two-and-a-half decades ago – has been further strengthened following the launch of these five new models.

With two completely new enduro models, the F 800 GS and F 650 GS, BMW Motorrad is not just expanding its range of products but also presenting a worthy successor to the successful single-cylinder F 650 GS.

F 650 GS
The F 650 GS, despite its familiar designation, is a completely new machine. Along with its bigger brother, the F 800 GS, it is powered by BMW’s sophisticated and highly praised 798cc parallel-twin engine, albeit in a softer state of tune, which provides plenty of power combined with excellent fuel economy. The bike’s low seat height and light controls make the F 650 GS an easy to handle all-rounder, perfectly suited to newcomers to motorcycling and ideal for everyday use.

F 800 GS
The all-new F 800 GS expands BMW Motorrad’s class leading traditions into the middleweight adventure sports category. The overall package combines balance, power and weight with excellent ground clearance and long suspension travel. The result is a machine with excellent off-road riding performance combined with touring capability.

G 450 X
Entering the competitive 450cc enduro market will be the brand new, no compromise, BMW G 450 X Sports Enduro. This machine will feature an innovative 450cc single cylinder engine and unique chassis design. Having been successfully tested in European and world competition throughout 2007, its entry into the 450cc Enduro market in the middle of next year will see BMW Motorrad continue its philosophy of launching class-leading machinery in competitive new market segments.

R 1200 GS and Adventure
There are also further improvements and developments to the all-terrain big boxer machines – the unchallenged choice of the world’s most adventurous overlanders, including Ewan MacGregor and Charley Boorman. The new version of the best selling R 1200 GS, and its Adventure variant, benefit from a more powerful engine with improved drive and traction. New for 2008, both models will be offered with the option of a new Enduro version of ESA (Electronic Suspension Adjustment).

The unique system offers R 1200 GS and Adventure owners the opportunity to tune their suspension for on or off-road use at the touch of a button.

Tony Jakeman, BMW Motorrad Marketing Manager, said: “With the launch of five exciting new models BMW Motorrad continues to broaden its appeal to a wider motorcycle audience. Eagerly anticipated models such as the F 650 GS and F 800 GS will not only attract new riders to BMW, but will also please existing Motorrad fans with their performance, handling and good looks.

“The up-rated versions of the best-selling R 1200 GS and Adventure, with our unique Electronic Suspension Adjustment system, will reinforce our leadership in the Adventure motorcycle sector. We are also excited to be entering even more diverse market segments with models such as the G 450 X, reinforcing our philosophy to launch class leading machinery into new motorcycle market sectors.”

New Moto Guzzi Stelvio 1200

New Moto Guzzi Stelvio 1200

The new Moto Guzzi Stelvio completes the range renovation programme
that, in little over 24 months, has seen this legendary marque regain
all its past splendour.







What was missing and what the public were impatiently
waiting for now is now available in the form of a complete motorcycle.
This is the Italian answer to the demand for a multi-purpose
maxi-enduro machine that can adapt to all conditions and restore the
pleasure of riding.



A machine with these characteristics could not have been a descendant
of previous models but was created as part of a totally new project. It
is the direct result of a long and painstaking research and development
programme that involved countless riders of all types and widely
differing conditions of use. Moto Guzzi undertook this challenge with
one particular key element already decided upon: the new
"Quattrovalvole" engine.



Docile and powerful at low and medium revs, this twin-cylinder, single
raised cam transverse unit is housed in a slender tubular frame that
appears so fundamental as to make even specialists in off-roading look
again. Riders will appreciate the absorption characteristics of the 50
mm upside-down forks and the traction offered by the combined action of
the rear single swingarm and the progressive rear suspension system,
not to mention the superb CA.R.C (reactive shaft drive) final drive. If
the fact that the Stelvio is very much at its ease on deceptive
surfaces with little adhesion is down to the superb frame design, its
decreased weight and smooth power delivery; its vocation as a tourer is
highlighted in the many little details that were specifically included
to make daily use sheer pleasure. The windscreen and saddle can be
adjusted, side bags come as standard and the pillion passenger’s part
of the saddle is more than comfortable in both size and shape. A small
storage compartment that can be unlocked from the handlebars has been
positioned between the screen and tank. It is the little details that
make all the difference and make riding this machine such a pleasure.
With over 100 CV on tap, the machine offers superb performance while
the sound it makes says it all. It goes without saying that safety is
at the forefront with powerful radial brake calipers housing twin
parallel pistons. Besides this Moto Guzzi Maxi-Enduro’s performance and
technology, there is another element that sets it apart from the
competition: its beauty. The Moto Guzzi Stelvio captivates with its
front end looks and slender profile. The aggressive Guzzi red or
sophisticated white colour schemes catch the eye and are set off by the
anodised tubeless spoked wheels

New Moto Guzzi Stelvio 1200

New Moto Guzzi Stelvio 1200

The new Moto Guzzi Stelvio completes the range renovation programme
that, in little over 24 months, has seen this legendary marque regain
all its past splendour.







What was missing and what the public were impatiently
waiting for now is now available in the form of a complete motorcycle.
This is the Italian answer to the demand for a multi-purpose
maxi-enduro machine that can adapt to all conditions and restore the
pleasure of riding.



A machine with these characteristics could not have been a descendant
of previous models but was created as part of a totally new project. It
is the direct result of a long and painstaking research and development
programme that involved countless riders of all types and widely
differing conditions of use. Moto Guzzi undertook this challenge with
one particular key element already decided upon: the new
"Quattrovalvole" engine.



Docile and powerful at low and medium revs, this twin-cylinder, single
raised cam transverse unit is housed in a slender tubular frame that
appears so fundamental as to make even specialists in off-roading look
again. Riders will appreciate the absorption characteristics of the 50
mm upside-down forks and the traction offered by the combined action of
the rear single swingarm and the progressive rear suspension system,
not to mention the superb CA.R.C (reactive shaft drive) final drive. If
the fact that the Stelvio is very much at its ease on deceptive
surfaces with little adhesion is down to the superb frame design, its
decreased weight and smooth power delivery; its vocation as a tourer is
highlighted in the many little details that were specifically included
to make daily use sheer pleasure. The windscreen and saddle can be
adjusted, side bags come as standard and the pillion passenger’s part
of the saddle is more than comfortable in both size and shape. A small
storage compartment that can be unlocked from the handlebars has been
positioned between the screen and tank. It is the little details that
make all the difference and make riding this machine such a pleasure.
With over 100 CV on tap, the machine offers superb performance while
the sound it makes says it all. It goes without saying that safety is
at the forefront with powerful radial brake calipers housing twin
parallel pistons. Besides this Moto Guzzi Maxi-Enduro’s performance and
technology, there is another element that sets it apart from the
competition: its beauty. The Moto Guzzi Stelvio captivates with its
front end looks and slender profile. The aggressive Guzzi red or
sophisticated white colour schemes catch the eye and are set off by the
anodised tubeless spoked wheels

2008 BMW F800GS

For BMW Motorrad, the abbreviation “GS” is not an empty promise. This will be demonstrated in the future by the F 800 GS too, in continuation of a long tradition. The new model not only offers the typical qualities of a travel enduro – it also offers superb off-road driving capabilities. Whilst large-capacity enduros sometimes reach their limits because of their weight and overall design, the new F 800 GS is completely unstoppable. The overall package combines balance power and weight, excellent ground clearance, long spring travel, precise wheel guidance and sophisticate ergonomics, giving excellent off-road driving and excellent long-distance performance.



2008 BMW F800GS

2008 BMW F800GS




2008 BMW F800GS

2008 BMW F800GS




2008 BMW F800GS






The chassis combines all the ingredients that a real enduro needs: a sturdy steel tube frame that allows a steering lock of 42 degrees, a rigid upside-down fork with 230 mm spring travel, a sturdy aluminium double-strut swing arm with a path-dependent cushioned spring strut and 215 mm spring travel and solid wire-spoke wheels. A 211" front wheel in the classic enduro dimensions of 90/90-21 gives running stability in slow off-road driving, whilst the rear wheel, with dimensions 150/70-17 ensures that the engine power is always transferred securely to the track